Month: June 2021 Page 1 of 14

The Rugby Championship Review: South Africa

first_img Return to form: Bryan Habana topped the scoring charts with seven triesby Ben ColesFinished: 3rdA TESTING tournament for Heyneke Meyer’s new Springboks saw them ultimately finish in third spot, their draw with Argentina earlier in the tournament keeping them out of second place.It is no secret that South Africa are rebuilding after the golden generation that captured the Rugby World Cup in 2007 departed last Autumn for Japan, France and retirement. The transition however has not gone smoothly.For so long Morné Steyn has been one of the game’s greatest marksmen, predictably slotting penalties that more often than not and winning plenty of fixtures for the Springboks. In The Rugby Championship however, he was woeful.Johan Goosen has been touted as the next great South African fly-half for some time and he did enough against Australia and New Zealand to suggest that he is the man for the future. The fact that he has been ruled out for six months following groin surgery this week means however that Morné’s time will come again.Whilst Bryan Habana may have repeatedly crossed the whitewash, South Africa continued to waste gilt-edged scoring opportunities at an alarming rate. In fact, Habana scored more tries than the rest of his teammates combined – seven to five.A lot of the blame for this falls at the feet of Steyn’s excessive kicking and poor game management. The pack were competitive as always, with Bath flanker Francois Louw and Eben Etzebeth (headbutt aside) particularly impressing, meaning the platform was there but the execution wasn’t. Their defence remains typically robust, but not at it’s earth-shattering best. The potential is there for the Springboks to become a force again but Meyer knows his squad need plenty of fine-tuning. JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – OCTOBER 06: Johan Goosen of South Africa kicks the ball upfield during the Rugby Championship match between South Africa Springboks and the New Zealand All Blacks at FNB Stadium on October 6, 2012 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) How they will fare in the November Internationals will doubtless be a focus of national debate.Star Player: Bryan HabanaThe Rugby Championship marked the renaissance of Bryan Habana. Once the world’s greatest winger, his time has come again as his try-scoring prowess returned to haunt all three opposing nations, totting up a total of seven tries to leave him two clear of the rest of the pack. After JP Pietersen enjoyed a similar return to form in the Summer Tests against England, it was fitting that his old partner in attack showed the predatory instincts of old.Rising Talent: Johan GoosenDespite only playing 150 minutes of Test Rugby, Goosen showed enough to show he could be something special. His performances for the Cheetahs before a serious shoulder injury highlighted his talent and at just 20 years of age he could be inked in to play for the Springboks over the next decade. While Morné Steyn is renowned for mercilessly pumping balls up into the sky, Goosen’s fluid running style, game awareness with his varied passing game offers a positive glimpse of the future for the Boks. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow Ben Coles on Twitter @bencoles_last_img read more

All Blacks’ kids could be in Wonderland for some time

first_img<> on October 29, 2013 in Tokyo, Japan. Another superb sophomore is Beauden Barrett – like Retallick a graduate of the 2011 Under 20 team handed his first taste of Tests last June in the series with Ireland. So far, he has had to make do with 14 of his 16 caps coming as a replacement. With a try and a last-gasp tackle to clinch that match at Ellis Park foreshadowing an equally game-breaking cameo in Dublin, Hansen must be giddy about what he could do over 80 minutes. For me, Barrett is Dan Carter’s natural successor, but having filled in at every position across the three-quarters – his first touch at Lansdowne Road was out-jumping Tommy Bowe to claim a cross-kick on the wing – he could probably choose which jersey he wants to inherit.Success breeds success, and a set-up that has lost once in 34 Tests since the start of the 2011 Rugby World Cup (unthinkably, they went into that tournament on the back of consecutive defeats) is pretty sturdy. Even so, consistently seamless individual transitions are astounding. Two wonderful try assists – Piutau’s stunning cat-flap in Paris and an effort from hooker Dane Coles to break Irish hearts – required confidence and dexterity, two qualities instilled in newcomers from the outset thanks as much to Hansen’s environment as the intense, skill-led nature of the Super 15.Championing swift promotions of Joe Launchbury and Marland Yarde among others, Stuart Lancaster is pursuing the same template – Anthony Watson could star in 2015. That said, his predecessors’ failure to build a legacy from the 2003 Webb Ellis win has had a knock-on effect.Naked ambition: Beauden Barrett chats with his team-matesWhile England’s average age was only a year younger than New Zealand’s when they last met, the hosts could boast a combined tally of 466 fewer international matches. A 38-20 reverse last December demonstrated the Kiwis can be vulnerable and that England will be contenders on home soil – next summer’s three-match series in the Land of the Long White Cloud should steel them further, too. However, the 2015 favourites tag will not be moving anywhere.The 2011 World Cup was a foundation for the All Blacks to stop their habit of peaking in the middle of four-year cycles. This progression continues with innovative steps such as freakish 20 year-old openside Ardie Savea (brother of behemoth Julian) touring Europe as an “apprentice” and seeing how his elders have negotiated sticky situations – a ferocious resurgence from the England pack, Ireland’s eye-watering opening onslaught – at first-hand. Already used to success: Flanker Steven Luatua celebrates winning the Bledisloe Cup with the All Black fansBy Charlie MorganEvery year, the Barbarians’ stay at Grosvenor House in London coincides with Winter Wonderland, a smattering of festive fair-ground rides that take over part of Hyde Park, a leisurely stroll away.Last week, the proximity of such revelry was apt for Steven Luatua. Immersed in a magical start to his Test career where losing must seem inconceivable, the shaggy-haired back-rower could not stop grinning. With new buddy Bismarck du Plessis in tow, he loped happily around the hotel like a kid at Christmas, exuding a charming appreciation of Barbarians tradition.At 22 with 11 blemish-free caps already, Luatua personifies the outstanding generation flying into New Zealand’s front ranks. A disbelieving smile was still plastered in place on Saturday as Twickenham’s open expanses presented a perfect platform to showcase his best against Fiji. Racking up 12 carries for 90 metres, beating three defenders and making three more offloads, Luatua shone for the famous invitational side – not that the international arena has hampered him. Indeed, his first three All Blacks starts were so action-packed and accomplished that some were surprised to see Liam Messam return for the defeat of South Africa in September.Boys about town: Piutau and LuatuaSeven more members of Steve Hansen’s touring party spent their weekend in the famous black and white hoops, Keven Mealamu a senior statesman among the hungry tyros. Four of them – Charles Piutau, Luke Whitelock, TJ Perenara and Dominic Bird – won the 2011 Junior World Championship with the Baby Blacks. There was also Tom Taylor, who made an assured Test bow in this year’s Bledisloe Cup. Frank Halai started on the Barbarians’ right wing, too. After a debut in Tokyo last month, it won’t be long before he is terrorising international defences more regularly.There was perhaps a hint of bravado in the New Zealand Herald’s ominous assertion that their national team is getting younger, but there is substance to their Benjamin Button theory.Four centurions and 959 caps punctuated the world champions’ squad to face England this autumn. Still, the average age of a side loaded with veterans was 26. Sam Whitelock, whose all-round excellence consistently sets him apart as the world’s premier lock, made his 50th appearance that day having only turned 25 a couple of weeks previously.Whitelock’s engine-room partner Brodie Retallick has just finished his second season in Hansen’s ranks. Aided by a hulking frame, he is influencing big games – a gargantuan, try-scoring shift during the Springboks clash in Auckland the best example. It is not as if he is merely an enforcer either; how many times has he been the midfield link-man this year? He even stepped in at scrum half before Julian Savea’s second at HQ. In his own blunt way, Hansen summed up world rugby in the week before his Twickenham vengeance. “England want to be second in the world,” he growled. “We’re number one and we want to get better.”You could transpose any nation into England’s place in that quote with the exception of South Africa. Thanks to on-going faith in his precocious youth, Hansen is ensuring the chase will be a long one. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Richard Parks and Gareth Thomas in Book Awards double

first_imgThis was the third time there has been a rugby double at the British Sports Book Awards, as in 2011 Tom English’s The Grudge won the Rugby Award and Brian Moore‘s Beware of the Dog won the Autobiography Award, and in 2012 Alastair Hignell‘s Higgy and Matt Hampson‘s Engage were both winners.This year awards were presented in ten categories in all, and each of the ten winning titles is now being put to an online public vote to determine the Overall CROSS British Sports Book of the Year in association with The Times. Parks‘ story of his journey from reluctantly retired rugby player to intrepid “extreme environment athlete” wowed the rugby award’s judging panel, which includes Rugby World‘s Alan Pearey (as chairman) and Katie Field. Beyond the Horizon, which was written in conjunction with Michael Aylwin, was Rugby World’s Book of the Month in December and in his speech at the awards dinner at Lords, Pearey called it a “remarkable and inspiring story”.Thomas‘s autobiography was also shortlisted for Rugby Book of the Year, and was Rugby World’s Book of the Month in November 2014. It was chosen as the Autobiography of the Year ahead of books by Ian Poulter, Chris Froome, Nicole Cooke, Roy Keane and Guy Martin.Ghost-written by Michael Calvin, Pearey called it “a very powerful story”.The other shortlisted rugby books were The Test by Brian O’Driscoll, The Secret Life of Twickenham by Chris Jones, Behind the Rose, Playing Rugby For England by Stephen Jones and Nick Cain, and Undefeated, the Story of the 1974 Lions by Rhodri Davies. Double delight: Parks (left) and Thomas. There was a rugby double at the CROSS British Sports Book Awards last night as Gareth Thomas won Autobiography of the Year for his book, Proud, and Richard Parks won the Rugby Book of the Year with Beyond the Horizon.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The vote, sponsored by National Book Tokens, is being held on the official website www.britishsportsbookawards.co.uk – with a prize draw of £100 National Book Tokens. The vote remains open until Tuesday, 16 June, with the winner announced shortly after.A highlights programme from last night’s awards ceremony will be shown on Saturday, 6 June at 10am on Sky Sports 4 and 1pm on Sky Sports 2, and on Sunday, 7 June at 11.30am on Sky Sports 2 and 7pm on Sky Sports 5.last_img read more

Hotshot: Dragons and Wales U20 wing Joe Goodchild

first_img TAGS: Dragons Find out more about Joe Goodchild, the wing who only took up the game in his mid-teens Red alert: Joe Goodchild poses for pictures after a Wales U20 game (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dragons and Wales U20 wing Joe Goodchild Date of birth 12 April 1998 Born Newport Region Dragons Country Wales Position Back threeWhen did you first play? When I was 15 or 16. My mates were playing so I went along to Garndiffaith. Before that I did gymnastics and a bit of football.How did you link up with the Dragons? I played one or two games for Ponty Schools, then we had a tournament to get drafted to the Dragons U16s. I was picked up from that and went from U16s to U18s and from there to Wales U18. I’ve been in the academy since then.What positions have you played? I’ve always been a winger. I’m tall and fast so they chucked me out there. I’ve also played full-back a bit. The way I want to play seems to fit with wing or full-back.How do you want to play? Running rugby. What feels right at that moment, beating defenders and having a go.What was it like making your Pro14 debut at the Millennium Stadium against Scarlets? Unbelievable. It was a completely different experience to anything else I’ve experienced. As we came out there were fireworks and fire, then how many people were there. As soon as you see that you want more.Who’s been the biggest influence on your career? Probably my parents. My dad played for Pontypool and Newport. Whenever I’ve been down, they’ve been there to pick me back up.What are your goals for next season? I want to kick on to the first team. There’s an U23 league coming in, so I’ll try to put in performances in that and pre-season games. Hopefully I can put a marker down and progress from there.What do you do away from rugby? I just chill out with my mates and try to switch off. It’s nice to have mates who I don’t always talk about rugby with. If I can, I’ll watch them play at local clubs.So you keep in touch with the grass roots?Big time. That’s how we got here at the end of the day. If it wasn’t for those clubs, I wouldn’t be here. RW VERDICT: Goodchild scored a key try in Wales’ win over Australia in the opening round of the Junior World Championship. His pace could be a significant weapon for the Dragons as they aim to climb the Pro14 table next season.This article originally appeared in the August 2018 issue of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Israel-Palestine: Deputies support positive investment, engagement

first_img Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: Deputy Russ Randle from the Diocese of Virginia, chair of the national and international concerns legislative committee, addresses the House of Deputies July 9 on resolutions concerning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The House of Deputies has overwhelmingly supported a call for the church to engage in positive investment in the Palestinian Territories.A call for corporate engagement with companies that contribute to the infrastructure of the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land also passed but with less enthusiasm.During the hour-long debate at the July 9 special order of business, the deputies rejected an amendment that would have had the church support a strategy of divestment, boycotts and sanctions against Israel.The two resolutions will need the backing of the House of Bishops for the legislation to become official Episcopal Church policy.Resolution B019 affirms positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories. It also calls on the church to support “the Jewish, Muslim, and Christian study on peace with justice in the Middle East,” and produce an annotated bibliography of resources.Resolution C060 calls on the church to engage “in corporate social responsibility by more vigorous and public corporate engagement with companies in the church’s investment portfolio that contribute to the infrastructure of the Occupation.”A minority report, signed by five members of the National and International Concerns committee that has been considering the legislation on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, also was read out to the deputies. The report expresses “disappointment that the 77th General Convention has not gone far enough in considering measures that would increase awareness and advocacy toward ending the Occupation of Palestine.”It expressed disappointment in the failure to include in the legislation two documents that had been recommended for study in several resolutions the committee considered.The texts are Kairos Palestine’s “A Moment of Truth” and an Episcopal adaption of the Presbyterian Church USA’s “Steadfast Hope” that include information about using boycotts, sanctions and divestment to pressure the Israeli government to end the occupation of the Palestinian Territories.Countering that point of view, Deputy Joanne O’Donnell from the Diocese of Los Angeles said that the documents “are decidedly one-sided. A church that is committed to reconciliation should not be committed to studying just one point of view.”Deputy Russ Randle from the Diocese of Virginia said the committee, which he chaired, had struggled “to discern how best to provide effective support” for Christians in the Holy Land, for the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and its leader Bishop Suheil Dawani, who has said that a divestment strategy is unhelpful at this time. Dawani told ENS that investment in the Palestinian Territories and in the ministry of the Jerusalem diocese is what is needed.Randle said that it is important for the church to work in close partnership with Palestinian Christians who can “provide us with the knowledge of the difficulties they face. Engagement at this time will make us far more effective advocates.”Allison Duvall, a deputy from the Diocese of Lexington and a member of the sub-committee that worked on the resolutions, said the legislation “honors what Bishop Suheil Dawani has asked of us.”“What we say here will directly impact the lives of our Anglican brothers and sisters in the Holy Land. They need to lift up a document that does not incriminate them in the eyes of the Israeli government,” she said. “The political situation is exceedingly complex and volatile and requires incredible diplomacy.”The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem operates more than 30 social service institutions throughout Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian Territories. Dawani, addressing the House of Bishops earlier in the week, said that as a diocese that has a presence in five Middle East countries “we have to keep a presence and balance among all the faith communities and governments of that region that will help us to play an important role to continue to be a bridge for peace and reconciliation.”Presenting Resolution C060, Randle said “the controversial part deals with economic issues” but that the objective is to improve the situation for Palestinians. Some efforts, he said, have called for economic sanctions, and drawn parallels between the occupation and apartheid South Africa.“Unlike the situation in South Africa where the church supported such sanctions, the bishop in Jerusalem has not supported such a measure,” Randle said, noting that calls for boycotts are “provocative and are unlikely to be effective.”One deputy reminded the house about the church’s official policy of “positive investment” and “corporate engagement” is recommended in the 2005 report of the Social Responsibility in Investments committee that was endorsed by Executive Council.The Rev. Vicki Gray, a deputy from the Diocese of California, called for the amendment to introduce the language about divestment and boycotts. “I recognize that this amendment requires courage. I recognize that we will be called names, among them anti-Semite,” she said. “It’s high time that we addressed the elephant in the room and reject that criticism of the Israeli government is not in any way anti-Semitic.”Four deputies rose to oppose the amendment, including the Rev. Michael Russell from San Diego, a member of the legislative committee. “I don’t find in divestment any generous tit-for-tat or anything that builds trust,” he said.Also on July 9, General Convention passed Resolution B017 urging the bishops and dioceses of the Episcopal Church “to join in fundraising efforts to help meet the shortfall created by the reduction in funding, and to advocate through the Episcopal Church for restoration of humanitarian fiscal aid to Al Ahli Hospital in Gaza from the global community.”The United Nations Relief and Works Agency announced June 1 it was ending its financial support to the hospital, an institution run by the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Middle East. The decision cuts the hospital’s budget by approximately $1 million per year, or nearly half.The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last week sent $50,000 to the hospital as part of its ongoing mission to support the institutions of the diocese.Previous stories on resolutions and public testimony related to Israel and Palestine are available here.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Israel-Palestine, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Robert Small says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Middle East Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anthony Vaccaro says: July 10, 2012 at 4:01 pm “The political situation is exceedingly complex and volatile and requires incredible diplomacy.”I think back to all the times in history that the Church has used these words……….. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Comments (6) July 10, 2012 at 3:19 am I don’t see any recognition that the Palistinians call for the destruction of Israel and the death of all Jews. To them all of Israel is occupied Palistinian territory. We might not be anti-Semites but we seem to be supporting the most violent anti-Semitism since the Nazi era. Active engagement is a good thing if the purpose is peacemaking. Not a good thing if it leads Palistinians to believe, however indirectly, that we support their desire to destroy Israel. Rosser Bobbitt says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 10, 2012 at 9:53 am Although I tend to agree that our response to the Israeli/Palestinian situation has been unbalanced in the way we have protected Israel, while leaving the Palestinians to hang in the wind, politically speaking, with terrible leaders, I do understand what Bishop Dawani has asked of us: “What we say here will directly impact the lives of our Anglican brothers and sisters in the Holy Land. They need to lift up a document that does not incriminate them in the eyes of the Israeli government,” she said. “The political situation is exceedingly complex and volatile and requires incredible diplomacy.”The Bishop certainly has lived out the very real effects of being incriminated “in the eyes of the Israeli government,” when he was recently divested of his authority to carry out his duties in all of the various parts of the Diocese in the middle east by that very same Israeli government. He is the authority here on this subject. Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Israel-Palestine: Deputies support positive investment, engagement Call for divestment via amendment strongly rejected Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ General Convention, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis General Convention 2012, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Robert Lange says: Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 9, 2012 July 10, 2012 at 2:58 pm “The Bishop certainly has lived out the very real effects of being incriminated “in the eyes of the Israeli government,” when he was recently divested of his authority to carry out his duties…”Does anyone recall (or care) why Bishop Dawani got into trouble with the authorities in the first place? He was accused of illegally selling land on behalf of the Palestinian Authority and forging documents. Luckily we were successful in lobbying the government to reissue his residency permit (although he still had a work visa) but we don’t know with certainty whether the allegations were true or false. Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 10, 2012 at 10:15 am I respectfully offer the opinion that the Episcopal Church has nothing to do with supporting the destruction of either Israelis or Palestinians or the death of all Jews. It’s not either/or, it is both/and insofar as the desire to maintain a Christian presence in the Holy Land for all three of the monotheistic religions. To imply that our presence in ,or our resolutions on Israel are “anti-semite” supporting the “most violent anti-Semitism since the Nazi era,” is inflammatory in the extreme and absolutely not true. Nothing about Bobbit’sstatement is congruent with the Christian presence in Israel/Palestine, religiously or politically or with the varying Episcopalian opinions. The arguments being presented pro and con as policy toward Israel/Palestine are thoughtful, in-depth treatments of this very complicated situation. I think we should supportthe effort to be fair, not compare it to the Nazis. I think it would be best to make truthful statements about this highly inflammatory situation with implications for the safety of the middle east, if not the whole world. Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 15, 2012 at 6:37 pm Rosser Bobbitt hit the nail on the head.This whole one sided series of actions by PCUSA provides aid and comfort to forces seeking violent destruction of the State of Israel and genocide of its Jewish population. If you deny that you are willfully deceiving the church and to be charitable, perhaps yourselves.There are many of us who will no longer associate ourselves formally with a church which is so arrogant that it takes sides in an extremely complex situation and ignores myriad evidence of the violent intentions of the Palestinians, plainly and repeatedly expressed.“From the River to the Sea, Palestine must be free!” Free of Jews, obviously. This is obviously not the formula for a shared state; for people living side by side in peace. If PCUSA is going to join extremists in sponsoring another Holocaust, I want no part of it. Its time for the church to quit mucking about in state politics and return to Christ’s teachings. I don’t recall Him calling for economic warfare. Shame be on the false prophets! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Australian primate issues statement on Royal Commission

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Anglican Communion News Service] The primate of the Anglican Church of Australia, Melbourne Archbishop Philip Freier, has issued a statement as the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse begins its final hearing with the Anglican Church in Sydney.Full article. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Australian primate issues statement on Royal Commission Submit a Job Listing Posted Mar 17, 2017 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

In defense of journalists in Apopka and everywhere

first_img Reply January 27, 2017 at 7:20 pm January 29, 2017 at 5:08 am Pentool TAGSJournalistsOpinion Previous articleSolar Bears game decided in shootoutNext articleMarch for Life hears from White House Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 5 COMMENTS Please enter your name here OpinionBy Reggie Connell It’s been a tough year for journalism.When a presidential candidate calls the media “the lowest form of life”, and phrases like post-truth, fake news, and alternative facts become a significant part of the American political language, then it’s clear the role of journalism as the fourth estate, the first draft of history, and the voice of the voiceless, has taken a significant hit.But that is a national media problem right?In my assessment, the media’s relationship in Apopka is cordial. It’s fair to say that tensions occasionally arise between Apopka journalists and elected officials, City staff, police and fire departments, but mutual respect is by far the prevailing trend.However, that trend took a distinct detour last week.During a workshop meeting at City Hall last week, City Attorney Cliff Shepard took aim at journalism several times in his 60-minute refresher course on the Sunshine Law for the Apopka City Council, the CRA Board, and the Planning Commission.Several of his remarks I take significant exception to.It started with Shepard complaining about an editorial published by The Apopka Chief almost two years ago. Shepard said that The Chief failed to contact him before publishing their editorial.  He went on to say that The Chief did not change a single word despite his complaints. And while it is common practice to treat an editorial (opinion) article different than a news article where a journalist would reach out to subjects in the article, I will let The Apopka Chief defend itself. It has been around 100 years after all, and that is not where his attack on journalism ended.Shepard created a hypothetical situation for his audience, and how they should handle this scenario with an aggressive reporter.“When a member of the media calls you and asks you to comment on something you are about to deliberate, you say no. What are they going to say? ‘Oh, no you should tell me so I can put your response in the newspaper before you deliberate and do what you’re supposed to do. I want to see that article. That’s stupid. You don’t do that.”Later he looked at the media table and said this…“My friends over here (at the media table) think I’m chastising them. I’m not. I was a member of the media. I was a journalism major before I went to law school and tried to figure out how to make more money. So the reality is I understand it’s a difficult job and I know they require all of this stuff. But they will have no hesitation to make your life miserable if they think you’ve infringed on it in any way. That’s sort of what their job is. But it doesn’t mean you have to fall for it. You shouldn’t. I’m just saying what’s real.”I do not speak for all journalists, but I can say for myself that I have NEVER written a critical word about anyone without significant hesitation beforehand, and without first giving that person an opportunity to tell their side of the story. I will also never try to trick a person into violating a Sunshine Law or try to make someone “fall” for anything that might embarrass them.That sort of tactic is for unethical broadcast celebrity “reporters” and it does not advance the truth, which good journalists are always in search of.In the last minute of Shepard’s presentation, he closed his thoughts on the media with this surprising metaphor in dialogue with Mayor Joe Kilsheimer.“It’s been said the media’s job is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable,” Kilsheimer said.Shepard responded with this:“Or to shoot the survivors of the battle.”Outside of a similar quote by Ernest Hemingway about critics, I don’t understand the metaphor of shooting the survivors of the battle as it applies to journalists, but I do know this…The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that since 1992, 1,228 journalists have been killed as a result of their efforts to bring us the news. That figure includes 800 that have been murdered. The most common subjects covered by them? Politics, war, human rights and corruption. These journalists shined the spotlight on the most egregious abuses in our world, and they paid the ultimate price for doing so.I am not a war-time journalist and I do not fear for my life reporting the news of Apopka. I respect everyone I report on, and I have been treated with respect, but in honor of those journalists that are in war zones, battlefields and have been killed on the job in an attempt to report the news, I could not let the words of the City Attorney go unanswered.I believe that excellent journalism, published independently and accurately, can help a community prosper and a municipal democracy flourish. I do not report on the news of Apopka to “catch” elected officials and attorneys in Florida Sunshine Law technical breaches, and I do not ascribe to the “gotcha” stereotypical caricature of journalists that The City Attorney is describing. I will go a step further and say that no one that I work with at The Apopka Voice, or sit with at the media table during City Council meetings does either to the best of my knowledge.It is my belief that an attorney who counsels elected officials on the intricacies of the Sunshine Law, who is precise with his word choices, and who warns our city council that “when it comes to the Sunshine Law, you can never be too careful” should be more careful in his word selection, descriptions, and opinions about journalists. Mama Mia Reply I agree that the journalists and reporters now days are being treated awful. Who do I blame? None other than our current president! I am sick of him running down the media and it’s employees. He wants to silence the news so our citizens won’t know what is going on. This is not how government is suppose to operate. Then we have the president’s advisor, Bannon, telling the media, that they need to keep their mouths shut. Bannon needs to keep his mouth shut, if you ask me. What is sad is that there are those in our society who support the president and believe every word he says, no matter what inaccurate things he says, especially against the media. The arrests of the journalists, and medics, on inauguration day, working out in the streets to report the news, and being taken to jail and charged with rioting, a felony, is outrageous! Reggie you can upgrade that second paragraph up there in your article, that starts out ” when a presidential candidate calls the media “the lowest life form”…….and you can now upgrade that part to president, formerly just a presidential candidate, calling the media terrible things………Reggie, I can see how you would take offense to what Cliff said during his presentation at the city workshop about the sunshine law, especially the part of what Cliff said, following the mayor’s comments, but I don’t really think Cliff meant anything sinister when he said that off- the- cuff hurriedly. Cliff is a fast talker and can go at it, (especially about how sausage is made!) but I don’t think Cliff is gunning for you guys at the press table, at least I hope he is not. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mia Mama Miacenter_img Yes, the reporters and journalists with their microphones in hand as missiles fly across the dark night skies in the war zone countries makes me think, I can’t believe they are there, and taking those kinds of risks to report. It is unthinkable that the president would be so ridiculous in criticizing the media. Often times I watch the local news and see a lady reporter sent up to the door of a manic deranged person, who has done some unthinkable action, and the lady reporter will knock on their door, and try to get them to the door to speak with them. I just think, no way, would I do that! I read all the news I can feed upon, whether it is right leaning, left leaning, local, state, national, or international, and I am thankful for the media, and they are taking a bad rap because of the president, and deserve more respect. Reply Mama Mia Please enter your comment! I didn’t attend the workshop but I did listen on the audio. Did I hear the public asking questions? You mean the public got to talk at a workshop…….shocking! LOL January 27, 2017 at 7:01 pm “But they will have no hesitation to make your life miserable if they think you’ve infringed on it in any way. That’s sort of what their job is.”Well, Mr Shepard…you got that part right. That is certainly their job. As a person working in the public sector, scrutiny comes with the territory.You still seem to be fuming about a 2 year old editorial. Here is the deal. You have attached yourself to politics. Journalists, under the First Amendment (Freedom of the Press) are the public’s ombudsmen. They have the freedom, no, let me go further…they have a responsibility to criticize and oppose. You, sir, and others in politics, have a responsibility to listen, answer and do the people’s work. Thank you Reggie, for bringing this to light. You give me hope that good solid journalism is still alive and kicking back! January 27, 2017 at 7:14 pm Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter January 27, 2017 at 7:30 pm Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

April Brings Lower Mortgage Rates

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear TAGSMortgage Previous articleIn case you missed it: Richard Anderson plea highlights the week in newsNext articleUCF Business Incubator Apopka turns 5 this month Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! At the beginning of the year, mortgage rates for the year fell from the previous year to hang around 4.2% across the board, making it the first time in several years that the rate started above 4%. From January to March, these rates rose steadily with March rates around the middle of the month averaging around 4.25%. In our local area, most lenders were much higher with rates averaging around 4.35%. Thankfully, April has brought lower rates along with our April showers with the current week beginning much lower and ending slightly lower than the week before. Overall April has been very favorable moving from the previous 4.25+% to hanging around 4.07% as the national average. Although this is lower, we’re still waiting to see a marked difference between the yearly average so far of 4.125-4.25%.The most recent influence on market trends is the US air strikes in Syria. Traditionally, a conflict involving the US pushes rates lower at first but quickly bounces back with more information available later on. However, with an exceptionally weak job report, rates pushed lower at least for the moment.This has been very good as rates have come down from as high as 4.5% to about 4.2%, though some still remain slightly higher. As long as the trend continues lower, now is as good a time as any to get a new mortgage. The thing to keep an eye on is when it begins to trend upwards again.* The above mortgage loan information is provided to or obtained by, Bankrate. The rate is based on 30-year fixed rate mortgage and a loan of $300,000.center_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

It’s Official: Mott files for City Commission Seat #1

first_img Truth be told It will take a lot to successfully fill the large shoes of retiring “icon” Apopka Commissioner Billie Dean, who along with former Apopka Commissioner Alonzo Williams, both, who are long time legends here in Apopka. Apopka needs to elect a new city commissioner who understands the deep cultural roots of this area, and who has been here throughout our city’s transition, and who hasn’t just learned the history of our city by reading history books, or hearing the stories, but by living here a long time, and experiencing our town’s morphing from small town into big city firsthand. Gene Knight, Theresa Mott, and Alexander Smith, all qualify! I wish you all the best….good luck on Seat 1, Gene, Alexander, and Theresa…..!!! Reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate October 26, 2017 at 10:15 pm Mama Mia October 20, 2017 at 11:26 am Please enter your comment! The VOICE of Apopka PoliticsJoins three other candidates in the raceTheresa MottTheresa Mott, an Apopka business owner and member of the Apopka Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, has officially filed to run for Seat #1 on the Apopka City Commission. Mott joins Suzanne Kidd, Gene Knight, and Alexander Smith in the race to succeed six-term Apopka City Commissioner Billie Dean on the City Commission. Dean announced in May that he will not seek a seventh term.Mott wrote on her personal Facebook page, and on a “Theresa Mott for Apopka City Commissioner Seat #1 page this statement:“IT’S OFFICIAL, Facebook Family!!! Today, I filed for Apopka City Commissioner, Seat #1. This was after extensive prayer, family support and years of community encouragement.I am a proud Native, Mother, 19-yr. Business Owner (created in Apopka), and actively involved Business Leader, with 25+ years of civic engagement. I have witnessed and contributed to our substantial growth over the years. However, there is more work required to ensure a trajectory beneficial to ALL citizens. Once elected, I pledge to LISTEN to your ideas, thoughts and concerns, and then be a STRONG VOICE FOR YOU on the council. Additionally, I will deliver positive solutions for the betterment of Apopka. Therefore, I respectfully ask for your vote, Tuesday, March 13th…thank you.” Mott’s filing ends several months of speculation about her political intentions for the 2018 Apopka elections. In 2014, Mott ran unsuccessfully for Seat#3 against Linda Laurendeau, and the eventual winner Sam Ruth.She is the former Chairman of the Board of the Apopka Area Chamber of Commerce, and the owner and founder of Professional Executive Services in Apopka, which is an administrative support company that provides secretarial services to small and medium-sized businesses. Mott founded Professional Executive Services in 1998. Please enter your name here I noticed that Theresa respectfully asks for your vote, Tuesday, March 13th….thank you. ( that is what she writes above) Now, that is the way it is suppose to be, she respectfully asks for our votes! She doesn’t tell us what to do….like, vote for me, she respectfully asks for our votes…… October 19, 2017 at 8:22 pm Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter I’m voting for integrity and knowledge. Suzanne Kidd gets my vote March 13th. TAGSApopka City CommissionTheresa Mott Previous article40,000 cubic yards of debris collected in ApopkaNext articleA “Bear” necessity: Orange County residents embrace bear resistant carts Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR truth be Told 5 COMMENTScenter_img Reply Mama Mia October 20, 2017 at 11:51 am Reply October 15, 2017 at 11:49 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear A vote for Ms. Kidd for the Apopka City Council, is a vote cast FOR A TAX INCREASE ON THE CITY OF APOPKA CITIZENS, make no mistake about that, meaning your annual property tax bill. She has been very clear about that. It is well documented on the city council meeting audios that are kept on record by the city, and available for your listening pleasure at Apopka.net under the meeting icon….please check it out, if you are not aware of her pro-tax millage rate increase position. I will not knowingly vote for a candidate for Apopka City Council who wants to impose a property tax increase on our citizens. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Mama Mia Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply Reply Janice Rapplast_img read more

What veterans’ poems can teach us about healing on Memorial Day

first_img Nice article reminding us of those that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our country!! Michael Heaton May 26, 2018 at 9:45 am TAGSMemorial Daytheconversation.com Previous articleThe Apopka Progressive Senior Prom: Years of fun, a generation to rememberNext articleA grilling legend is returning to Apopka for your Memorial Day barbecue feast! Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here By James Dubinsky, Associate Professor of English, Virginia Tech and first published on theconversation.com.Memorial Day, a national holiday to honor the 1.17 million men and women who have died to create and maintain the freedoms outlined in our Constitution, is not the only Memorial Day.The holiday emerged from the Civil War as a celebration almost exclusively for veterans of the Union Army to remember those who had died. Veterans and their families from Confederate states held their own celebrations. Thus, it remains fraught with conflict and ambiguity.In 2017, seven states – Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia – chose to also celebrate some form of Confederate Memorial Day. It’s usually celebrated on April 26 – the day associated with the surrender of General Joe Johnston, nine days after General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox at the end of the Civil War.How can we overcome these deep divides?Having served 28 years in the U.S. Army and as a teacher and researcher who studies the roles veterans and their family play in society, I believe poems written by veterans that focus on honoring those who have died may give us a clue.Bridging divisionsThe tension between North and South remains. We see it not only on days dedicated to remembrance. It surfaces daily as communities such as New Orleans wrestle with whether or not to keep memorial statues honoring Confederate leaders like Robert E. Lee.Seaman Daniel Odoi of the Navy Operational Support Center of New York City presents the American flag on Memorial Day 2013. AP Photo/John MinchilloOne poet who does not ignore these divides is Yusef Komunyakaa, an Army veteran who served in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970 and earned a Bronze Star. He is now a professor at New York University.In “Facing It,” a poem about visiting the Vietnam War Memorial, Komunyakaa, an African-American, confronts the wall and issues linked to war and race. He writes:“My black face fades / hiding inside the black granite.”But he is also a veteran honoring those who died; he is balancing the pain of loss with the guilt of not being a name on the wall:“I go down the 58,022 names, / half-expecting to find / my own in letters like smoke. / I touch the name Andrew Johnson; / I see the booby trap’s white flash.”The poem ends with two powerful images that offer a glimmer of hope:“A white vet’s image floats / closer to me, then his pale eyes / look through mine. I’m a window. / He’s lost his right arm / inside the stone. In the black mirror / a woman’s trying to erase names: / No, she’s brushing a boy’s hair.”The image of the speaker becoming a “window” addresses how two vets, one white and one black, bridge the racial divide and become linked through shared acts of sacrifice and remembrance. Yet even with such a positive affirming metaphor, the speaker’s mind and heart are not fully at ease.The next image creates dissonance and worry: Will the names be erased? The concluding line relieves that worry – the names are not being erased. More importantly, the final image of a simple act of caring calls to mind the sacrifices made to protect women and children by those whose names are on the wall. As a result, their image in the stone becomes a living memorial.Memory and reflectionWe can also learn from Brock Jones, an Army veteran who served three tours of duty in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. He named his award-winning book “Cenotaph,” the name for a tomb to honor those whose graves lie elsewhere. By using the name of a monument for those not present, a monument with historical ties to ancient Greece and Egypt as well as our own culture, Brock highlights how honoring the dead goes beyond culture and country.Jones’ poems do not focus outward toward social strife, but inward. They address language’s inability to capture or express loss linked to memories of war. They also point to how those remaining alive, particularly those who have not served, might come to understand the depth of the sacrifice expressed by memorials and, by extension, Memorial Day.In “Arkansas,” a poem that takes place at the Arkansas pillar, one of 56 pillars at the National WWII Memorial in Washington, D.C., the speaker remembers a journey with his grandfather:“Dead eight years ago this summer / to the Atlantic pavilion engraved / with foreign names he never forgot. / Bastogne. / Yeah, we was there. / St. Marie Eglise. / We was near there.”The poem ends with the grandfather described as “a hunched figure, in front of ARKANSAS. Still, in front of ARKANSAS.” The grandfather is burdened by memories he carries, memories that render him “still” (motionless), memories that will remain with him “still.”“Memorial from a Park Bench” offers a broader perspective, one that any visitor sitting on a bench in front of a memorial might experience. For the visitor, the memorial becomes “an opened book,” a place where “A word loses its ability to conjure/trapped inside a black mirror.”The words are “names,” which “could be lines / of poems or a grocery list. / They could be just lines.” But they are not “just lines.”At poem’s end, when all is contemplated, “Here are names and black stone / and your only reflection.”Jones shifts the emotional and intellectual burden from the person on the bench to the poem’s readers, and thus to broader society. These words cannot be just lines or lists; they become, by being memorialized in a black stone, a “mirror,” the reader’s and thus society’s “reflection.” All on the bench are implicated; the names died for us, and, as a result, are us.Memorial Day and mindfulnessMemorial Day may have “official” roots honoring Union dead, but veteran poets of recent wars serving the United States have found ways to honor all those who have died in battle.Our country may be divided, but by taking a moment to pause and reflect on names etched on monument walls or gravestones, everyone on benches may see their own reflections, and in so doing further the task President Abraham Lincoln outlined in his 1865 Second Inaugural Address “to bind up the nation’s wounds…to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.”By being mindful, we might understand what Robert Dana, a WWII vet wrote in “At the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C.”: that “These lives once theirs / are now ours.” Please enter your comment! 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